• Protect New Jersey Cats
    Policy barriers at the state level make it more difficult for communities to adopt effective trap-neuter-vaccinate-return (TNVR) ordinances. As a result, community cat populations continue to grow and put stress on shelters that have limited resources. Community cats (aka stray or free-roaming cats) risk losing their lives simply because they've made a home in the outdoors. In many cases, they are brought to local shelters, where they are unlikely to get adopted because many of them aren't socialized to people. Trap-neuter-vaccinate-return (TNVR) is simple: Community cats are trapped, evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, and returned to their outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. By implementing TNVR, community cats continue to live in their outdoor homes after they’ve been spayed or neutered and vaccinated for rabies, keeping them out of shelters and freeing up resources for pets most in need of sheltering and care. New Jersey should not have barriers to humane, safe, and cost-effective management of stray cats that is known to be effective at controlling the cat population. State leaders need to hear from you, their constituents, that this matters to you and your community. Sign the petition to support New Jersey cats. Resources: https://www.felineresearch.org/post/issue-brief-what-to-do-with-feral-cats-examining-tnr
    100 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Kaitlyn S. Picture
  • Stop Puppy Mill Sales in Fentress County
    More than 440 other cities, counties and states have already passed laws to stop the retail sale of pets sourced from commercial breeding facilities. It's time for our community to do the same. Puppy and kitten mills are in business to supply pet stores. The pets in these facilities often spend their entire lives in dirty, crowded cages for the sole purpose of producing as many animals as possible for the retail pet trade. Pet stores that obtain animals from these facilities are not an asset to our community. These facilities also produce puppies that are often sick, causing unsuspecting consumers to have to care for a new pet in need of expensive veterinary treatment. Milled puppies can also spread campylobacter, a dangerous, drug-resistant bacteria that is contagious to humans. In the past several years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) traced a multi-state outbreak of Campylobacter to pet store puppies. This is a public health risk in a time where public health should be a top priority. A humane pet sales ordinance will not prevent pet stores from doing business, but it will reduce the burden on our shelters and rescue groups by increasing pet adoptions. It will also benefit our local ethical hobby breeders by allowing them to provide responsibly bred pets directly to those who cannot find what they are looking for through adoption. Please consider protecting pets and consumers by passing a humane pet sales ordinance for our community.
    113 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Hunter C.
  • Saving Cats in Our Community - Beeville, Texas, Bee County
    In order to create compassionate no-kill communities and achieve no-kill for cats nationwide, we need communities to support lifesaving programs like Trap-Neuter-Return [TNR]. The process is simple: cats are caught (often by volunteers), evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, and returned to their original outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. These programs are also proven to be the most cost-effective, veterinarian-approved, and animal-friendly solution for controlling and reducing free-roaming cat populations.
    58 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Dara C.
  • Liderazgo de la ciudad, Odessa merece algo mejor
    ¿Porque es esto importante? El 83% de los tejanos creen que sus comunidades deberían adoptar pólizas que reduzcan la cantidad de perros y gatos sanos y curables que mueren en sus refugios. Los residentes de Odessa quieren que sus funcionarios sepan que apoyan la priorización de salvar las vidas de los animales de Odessa. La ciudad de Odessa ha rechazado ofertas de apoyo incluyendo una programación integral para salvar gatos. Mientras los funcionarios de Odessa han respondido a la crisis de las mascotas y la falta de recursos agregando restricciones excesivas sin ofrecer apoyo del refugio ni de la ciudad a la gente de Odessa. Los gatos comunitarios (también conocidos como gatos callejeros o que deambulan libremente) en Odessa corren el riesgo de perder la vida simplemente porque han creado un hogar al aire libre. Muchos de estos gatos prosperan viviendo al aire libre porque alguien en su comunidad los cuida. Estos programas utilizan atrapar-esterilizar-regresar (TNR) para salvar gatos. El proceso es simple: los gatos comunitarios son atrapados, evaluados por veterinarios, vacunados, esterilizados o castrados, se les cortará la punta de la oreja y se les devuelve a sus hogares al aire libre, sin poder tener gatitos. Se ha demostrado que programas que salvan vidas como estos son las soluciones más económicas, aprobadas por veterinarios y respetuosas con los animales para controlar y reducir las poblaciones de gatos comunitarios [o callejeros]. Es importante que sus funcionarios electos sepan que el acceso a los recursos para gatos, el salvamento de animales y la transparencia de los datos del refugio son importantes para la gente de Odessa. Su voz es una parte fundamental para garantizar que las mascotas y las personas en Odessa tengan acceso a estos recursos. Firme la petición para que los funcionarios de la ciudad sepan que este cambio es necesario y deseado. ¿Se ha visto afectado por este problema? Envíenos un correo electrónico para contarnos por qué esto es importante para usted. Para más información: Programación comunitaria para gatos: https://bestfriends.org/es/historias/articulos/programa-aver-atrapar-vacunar-esterilizar-regresar
    11 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Kaitlyn S. Picture
  • City leadership, Odessa deserves better
    83% of Texans believe that their community should adopt policies that decrease the number of healthy, treatable dogs and cats that are killed in their shelter. Odessa residents want their elected officials to know they support prioritizing saving the lives of Odessa animals. The city of Odessa has rejected offers of support including comprehensive cat programming. Meanwhile Odessa officials have responded to the pet crisis and lack of resources by adding excessive restrictions without offering shelter or city support to the people of Odessa. Community cats (aka stray or free-roaming cats) in Odessa risk losing their lives simply because they've made a home in the outdoors. Many of these cats are thriving living outdoors because someone in their community cares for them. These programs use trap-neuter-return (TNR) to save cats. The process is simple: Community cats are trapped, evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, ear-tipped, and returned to their outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. Lifesaving programs like these are proven to be the most cost-effective, veterinarian-approved, and animal-friendly solutions for controlling and reducing free-roaming cat populations. It is important your elected officials know that access to cat resources, animal lifesaving, and data transparency is important to the people of Odessa. Your voice is a critical part of ensuring that pets and people in Odessa have access to these resources. Sign the petition to let city officials know this change is needed and wanted. Have you been impacted by this issue? Send us an email to tell us about why this matters to you. Reference the facts: Community cats and public health: https://www.felineresearch.org/post/issue-brief-feral-cats-and-public-health TNR and population management: https://www.felineresearch.org/post/issue-brief-what-to-do-with-feral-cats-examining-tnr Cat health and welfare with TNR: https://www.felineresearch.org/post/issue-brief-feral-cat-health
    320 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Kaitlyn S. Picture
  • Little Rock – our dogs need us
    Together we can make sustainable changes that save lives while creating a framework of support for the pets of Little Rock. Animals who end up at the animal shelter are part of this community and city officials need to know that the people of Little Rock care about shelter animals dying. In 2022, Little Rock Animal Village took in 2795 dogs and 1140 cats. While 86% of cats were saved, only 56% of dogs made it out alive. Little Rock is killing more dogs than anywhere else in the state of Arkansas. Supporting our community means supporting our shelter and programs that focus on providing safe and positive outlets for cats and dogs entering shelters. It is important your representatives know that saving cats and dogs is important to the people of Little Rock. In a recent poll, 78% of likely voters in Little Rock believe the shelter should adopt policies that reduce the number of dogs and cats being killed at the shelter as opposed to 6% that do not. All dogs in Little Rock deserve a chance at a happy, healthy life. By joining this effort, you can be part of creating a healthier community for pets and people. Show your support by signing and sharing this petition today!
    236 of 300 Signatures
    Created by David W.
  • Baltimore animals are in crisis. Act now to support BARCS
    BARCS budget has not been significantly increased since 2008 when the City covered 80% of the cost. The City is now covering only 20% of BARCS operating costs. It's time to update City funding to reflect the changing community needs and do something before Baltimore sees an entirely preventable and tragic loss of pets' lives. Baltimore citizens love their pets and ask the City Council and the Mayor to stand up for BARCS now. For too many years, BARCS has been saving lives on a shoe string. BARCS is THE ONLY public, open-admission animal service for the entire city. Increasing the City's share of the budget from $1.3M to at least $3M will allow BARCS to properly staff the shelter, to cover the rising costs of inflation and to account for the increasing costs of animal medical and community needs. Dogs like Small Fry are the reason that BARCS needs increased funding. Small Fry was found trapped in a Baltimore house, alone for at least a week. Her severe emaciated condition indicated that she was neglected for much, much longer. In fact, when she came to BARCS, she was barely able to wag her tail due to human neglect. Thanks to BARCS, Small Fry was nursed back to health with high quality medical care. She was adopted into a loving home -- even finding the doggy love of her life. You can see Small Fry's Dog Wedding picture at the top of this petition. Thanks to BARCS more than 10,000 pets like Small Fry have happy endings each year. But as the City's portion of funding decreases, dogs like Small Fry find themselves at risk. This is why Baltimore City needs to significantly raise the budget for BARCS. In addition to properly funding BARCS, the city needs to hire a police officer who is full-time and designated to investigate animal abuse cases, as well as appoint a chair to the City's Animal Abuse Commission. For more information on this topic, check out this Sun article that explores this in depth. https://www.baltimoresun.com/opinion/op-ed/bs-ed-op-barcs-animal-shelter-crisis-20230803-eqwl4w7mbjej7nro5svznwyrqm-story.html
    631 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Christina P.
  • Rains County citizens support the need for Animal Services
    We stand at a crucial juncture where our collective compassion and responsibility can make a profound impact on the lives of the most vulnerable members of our community – our animals. The pressing need for an animal shelter in our town is a call to action that requires the unwavering support of each and every one of us. By supporting the construction of an animal shelter, we are taking a stand for the voiceless, the abandoned, and the neglected. The benefits of an animal shelter extend beyond the animals themselves. Not only does it give every citizen a resource to reach out to for assistance with stray animals, it also provides current pet owners support. It's about fostering a sense of unity among us, as citizens who care deeply about the well-being of all living creatures. By supporting this endeavor, we send a powerful message about the kind of community we aspire to be – one that prioritizes empathy, respect, and the value of life. Let us come together and make the dream of an animal shelter a reality. Together, we can create a legacy of compassion that will resonate for generations to come.
    461 of 500 Signatures
    Created by Katelyn G. Picture
  • Support Cat Programming in Utah County
    Community cats (aka stray or free-roaming cats) risk losing their lives simply because they've made a home in the outdoors. In many cases, they are brought to local shelters where they are at risk of being killed. Many of these cats are thriving living outdoors because someone in their community cares for them. That's where community cat programs come in. These programs use trap-neuter-return (TNR) to save cats. The process is simple: Community cats are trapped, evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, ear-tipped, and returned to their outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. Lifesaving programs like these are proven to be the most cost-effective, veterinarian-approved, and animal-friendly solutions for controlling and reducing free-roaming cat populations. Your voice is a critical part of ensuring that pets and people in Utah County have access to these resources. Become part of a driven and diverse group of people who believe that all pets and people deserve compassion, and that -- when we work together -- we can create real change for pets in need. Have you been impacted by this issue? Send us an email to tell us about why this matters to you. Reference the facts: Community cats and public health: https://www.felineresearch.org/post/issue-brief-feral-cats-and-public-health TNR and population management: https://www.felineresearch.org/post/issue-brief-what-to-do-with-feral-cats-examining-tnr Cat health and welfare with TNR: https://www.felineresearch.org/post/issue-brief-feral-cat-health
    818 of 1,000 Signatures
    Created by Keiko B.
  • Saving Cats in Our Community - [Bartow County, Georgia]
    In order to create compassionate no-kill communities and achieve no-kill for cats nationwide, we need communities to support lifesaving programs like Trap-Neuter-Return [TNR]. The process is simple: cats are caught (often by volunteers), evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, and returned to their original outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. These programs are also proven to be the most cost-effective, veterinarian-approved, and animal-friendly solution for controlling and reducing free-roaming cat populations.
    118 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Stella C.
  • Saving & Caring For Cats in Our Community
    In order to create compassionate no-kill communities and achieve no-kill for cats nationwide, we need communities to support lifesaving programs like Trap-Neuter-Return [TNR]. The process is simple: cats are caught (often by volunteers), evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, and returned to their original outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. These programs are also proven to be the most cost-effective, veterinarian-approved, and animal-friendly solution for controlling and reducing free-roaming cat populations.
    92 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Annastasia G.
  • TNR Program for Devore Animal Shelter
    In order to create compassionate no-kill communities and achieve no-kill for cats nationwide, we need communities to support lifesaving programs like Trap-Neuter-Return [TNR]. The process is simple: cats are caught (often by volunteers), evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, and returned to their original outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. These programs are also proven to be the most cost-effective, veterinarian-approved, and animal-friendly solution for controlling and reducing free-roaming cat populations.
    641 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Arely M.